Gallup reports:

Two years after the Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v. Hodges that states could not prohibit same-sex marriages, 10.2% of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) adults in the U.S. are married to a same-sex spouse. That is up from 7.9% in the months prior to the Supreme Court decision in 2015, but only marginally higher than the 9.6% measured in the first year after the ruling.

As the percentage of LGBT adults in same-sex marriages has increased over the past two years, the percentage in same-sex domestic partnerships has fallen sharply from 12.8% before the Supreme Court ruling to 6.6%.

About half of the decline in same-sex domestic partnerships can be explained by the increase in same-sex marriages. The rest of the decline could mean that others formerly in same-sex domestic partnerships may have stopped living together, or no longer consider a same-sex cohabitant as a “partner.”

As a result of these shifts, Gallup estimates that 61% of same-sex, cohabiting couples in the U.S. are now married, up from 38% before the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in June 2015, and 49% one year ago.