These books have been discussed and chosen by members of the asexual community. The characters either are said to be asexual, or by their behavior and description have been deemed asexual.

A Clergyman’s Daughter – George Orwell

“Intimidated by her father, the rector of Knype Hill, Dorothy performs her submissive roles of dutiful daughter and bullied housekeeper. Her thoughts are taken up with the costumes she is making for the church school play, by the hopelessness of preaching to the poor and by debts she cannot pay in 1930s Depression England. Suddenly her routine shatters and Dorothy finds herself down and out in London. She is wearing silk stockings, has money in her pocket and cannot remember her name. Orwell leads us through a landscape of unemployment, poverty and hunger, where Dorothy’s faith is challenged by a social reality that changes her life.” (Dorothy Hare – SA)

A Room With a View – E.M. Forster

“A Room with a View is a novel written by English writer E. M. Forster. It is the story of a young woman who is living in the culture repressed Edwardian England. The main setting of this work us England and Italy, and is a critique of English society during beginning of the 20th century and also a story of romance. A Room with a View is highly recommended for those who enjoy the writings of author E. M. Forster and also for those discovering his works for the first time.” (Mr. Beebe and Cecil Vyse – SA)

All Souls – Javier Marías and Magaret Jull Costa

“In All Souls, our narrator, a visiting Spanish lecturer, viewing Oxford through a prismatic detachment, is alternately amused, puzzled, delighted, and disgusted by its vagaries of human vanity. A bit lonely, not always able to see his charming but very married mistress, he casts about for activity; he barely has to teach. His stay of two years, he recalls, involved duties which “were practically nil”–“Oxford is, without a doubt, one of the cities in the world where least work gets done, where simply being is far more important than doing or even acting.”

The Bachelor Brothers’ Bed and Breakfast – Bill Richardson

“A pair of endearingly eccentric bachelors–in their fifties, and fraternal twins–own and operate a bed & breakfast establishment where people like them, the “gentle and bookish and ever so slightly confused,” can feel at home. Hector and Virgil think of their B&B as a refuge, a retreat, a haven, where folks may bring their own books or peruse the brothers’ own substantial library. An antic blend of homespun and intellectual humor, Bachelor Brothers’ Bed and Breakfast is a place readers will want to return to again and again.” (Virgil – SA)

The Bone People – Keri Hulme

“ Set on the South Island beaches of New Zealand, a harsh environment, the novel chronicles the complicated relationships between three emotional outcasts of mixed European and Maori heritage. Kerewin Holmes is a painter and a loner, convinced that “to care for anything is to invite disaster.” Her isolation is disrupted one day when a six-year-old mute boy, Simon, breaks into her house. The sole survivor of a mysterious shipwreck, Simon has been adopted by a widower Maori factory worker, Joe Gillayley, who is both tender and horribly brutal toward the boy. Through shifting points of view, the novel reveals each character’s thoughts and feelings as they struggle with the desire to connect and the fear of attachment.” (Kerewin Holmes – SA)

The Book of Disquiet – Fernando Pessoa

“A self-deprecating reflection on the sheer distance between the loftiness of feelings and the humdrum reality of life, The Book of Disquiet is a classic of existentialist literature.” (Bernardo Soares – SA)

Bridge to Terabithia – Katherine Patterson

“Discover the beloved Newbery Medal-winning story of Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke. Join Jess and Leslie as they form an unlikely friendship and create the imaginary land of Terabithia. There they rule as king and queen, until a terrible tragedy occurs that helps Jess understand just how much he has learned from Leslie.”

Note: The friendship between Leslie and Jess is a perfect example of platonic love.

Carrie Pilby – Caren Lissner

“Teen Genius (and Hermit) Carrie Pilby’s To-Do List:

1. List 10 things you love (and DO THEM!)

2. Join a club (and TALK TO PEOPLE!)

3. Go on a date (with someone you actually LIKE!)

4. Tell someone you care (your therapist DOESN’T COUNT!)

5. Celebrate New Year’s (with OTHER PEOPLE!)

Seriously? Carrie would rather stay in bed than deal with the immoral, sex-obsessed hypocrites who seem to overrun her hometown, New York City. She’s sick of trying to be like everybody else. She isn’t! But when her own therapist gives her a five-point plan to change her social-outcast status, Carrie takes a hard look at herself—and agrees to try. Suddenly the world doesn’t seem so bad. But is prodigy Carrie really going to dumb things down just to fit in?” (Carrie Pilby)

Case Histories: A Novel – Kate Atkinson

“Cambridge is sweltering, during an unusually hot summer. To Jackson Brodie, former police inspector turned private investigator, the world consists of one accounting sheet – Lost on the left, Found on the right – and the two never seem to balance. Surrounded by death, intrigue and misfortune, his own life haunted by a family tragedy, Jackson attempts to unravel three disparate case histories and begins to realise that in spite of apparent diversity, everything is connected…” (Amelia, Philip – SA)

The Cider House Rules – John Irving

“First published in 1985, The Cider House Rules is set in rural Maine in the first half of the twentieth century. The novel tells the story of Dr. Wilbur Larch–saint and obstetrician, founder and director of the orphanage in the town of St. Cloud’s, ether addict and abortionist. This is also the story of Dr. Larch’s favorite orphan, Homer Wells, who is never adopted.” (Dr. Wilbur Larch)

The Collector – John Fowles

“Ever since he first saw her, Frederick Clegg has been obsessed with Miranda Grey. The repressed, introverted butterfly collector admires the beautiful, privileged art student from afar until he wins the Lottery and buys a remote country house, planning to bring her there as his “guest”. Having abducted and imprisoned her in the cellar, he soon finds this reality is far from his fantasy and their tense, claustrophobic relationship leads to a devastating climax.” (Ferdinand Clegg)

Crampton Hodnet – Barbara Pym

“Formidable Miss Doggett fills her life by giving tea parties to young academics and acting as watchdog of the morals of North Oxford. Anthea, her great-niece, is in love with a dashing upper-class undergraduate with political ambitions. Of this, Miss Doggett thoroughly approves. Anthea’s father, however, an Oxford don, is tired of his marriage and carrying on in the most unseemly fashion with his student Barbara Bird – they have been spotted together at the British Museum! Miss Doggett isn’t aware, though, that under her very own roof the lodging curate has proposed to her paid companion Miss Morrow. She wouldn’t approve of that at all.”(Barbara Bird – SA)

Darkly Dreaming Dexter – Jeff Lindsay

“Meet Dexter Morgan, a polite wolf in sheep’s clothing. He’s handsome and charming, but something in his past has made him abide by a different set of rules. He’s a serial killer whose one golden rule makes him immensely likeable: he only kills bad people. And his job as a blood splatter expert for the Miami police department puts him in the perfect position to identify his victims. But when a series of brutal murders bearing a striking similarity to his own style start turning up, Dexter is caught between being flattered and being frightened – of himself or some other fiend.”

The Dwarf – Pär Lagerkvist (the dwarf)

“The Dwarf is an exploration of individual and social identity. The novel, set in a time when Italian towns feuded over the outcome of the last feud, centers on a social outcast, the court dwarf PIccoline. From his special vantage point Piccoline comments on the court’s prurience and on political intrigue as the town is gripped by a siege. Gradually, Piccoline is drawn deeper and deeper into the conflict, and he inspires fear and hate around him as he grows to represent the fascination of the masses with violence.”

Forbidden Colors – Yukio Mishima

“From one of Japan’s greatest modern writers comes an exquisitely disturbing novel of sexual combat and concealed passion, a work that distills beauty, longing, and loathing into an intoxicating poisoned cocktail. An aging, embittered novelist sets out to avenge himself on the women who have betrayed him. He finds the perfect instrument in Yuichi, a young man whose beauty makes him irresistible to women but who is just discovering his attraction to other men. As Yuichi’s mentor presses him into a loveless marriage and a series of equally loveless philanderings, his protégé enters the gay underworld of postwar Japan. In that hidden society of parks and tearooms, prostitutes and aristocratic blackmailers, Yuichi is as defenseless as any of the women he preys on. Mordantly observed, intellectually provocative, and filled with icy eroticism, Forbidden Colors is a masterpiece.”

Geek Love – Katherine Dunn

“Geek Love is the story of the Binewskis, a carny family whose mater- and paterfamilias set out–with the help of amphetamine, arsenic, and radioisotopes–to breed their own exhibit of human oddities. There’s Arturo the Aquaboy, who has flippers for limbs and a megalomaniac ambition worthy of Genghis Khan … Iphy and Elly, the lissome Siamese twins … albino hunchback Oly, and the outwardly normal Chick, whose mysterious gifts make him the family’s most precious–and dangerous–asset.”(Miss Lick – SA)

Herland – Charlotte Perkins Stetson Gilman

“ The novel is described as a feminist novel. Yet, this is not exactly accurate. The absence of men in the utopian society may seem extreme to some, and it is. This is how Gilman makes her point. She does not create a world without men because men are terrible creatures who have corrupted the world. The utopia which lacks men is a clean peaceful place, excelling in every way American society fails. But, it is neither the absence of men nor the presence of women that facilitates this.” (the women – SA)

The Hyannis House – Gordon Mathieson

“A US Senator from Cape Cod, Massachusetts is murdered and any of three people soon become suspects. There is however, a second murder in Boston, that ties into the first, and complicates the case for detectives. It isn’t until a former college sweetheart of the Senator’s wife comes into the scene that clues pop up in strange places. Although bizarre, these begin to make sense in solving the murders. There is a forbidden romance and love story embedded in the mystery and makes the reader question who the real murderer might turn out to be.”

Infinite Jest – David Foster Wallace

“Somewhere in the not-so-distant future the residents of Ennet House, a Boston halfway house for recovering addicts, and students at the nearby Enfield Tennis Academy are ensnared in the search for the master copy of INFINITE JEST, a movie said to be so dangerously entertaining its viewers become entranced and expire in a state of catatonic bliss …” (Hal Incandenza – SA)

(Source – AVEN)