After Vanity Fair’s cover story introducing Caitlyn Jenner to the world called her brave for her courage to make the transition from a man into a woman, everybody had something to say about it. However, Terry Coffey’s opinion, man from Salem, Oregon, “became an overnight social media sensation this week, for a lesson about hate we can all take to heart”. Courtesy: KSDK.

Coffey decided to search online for photos that showed military bravery. He found a World War II scene that showed a soldier carrying an injured fellow soldier, still firing at the enemy. He posted a photo on Monday night (June 1, 2015) on his Facebook account about the Caitlyn Jenner’s transition as well as a photo he found of “real American bravery”.

In that post he said (he added the photo he found):

As I see post after post about Bruce Jenner’s transition to a woman, and I hear words like, bravery, heroism, and courage, just thought I’d remind all of us what real American courage, heroism, and bravery looks like!

That post quickly went viral, it was shared more than 750,000 times since it was posted. He had lots of replies and some people even sent photos of cases that they thought were examples of bravery, heroism, and courage. You can click here to see all those posts of people having the same opinion. The post was also picked up by Phil Robertson, the ultra-conservative personality of a reality show and activist with 1.4 million followers on Facebook. After two days, hundreds of thousands of people had seen it.

“Coffey’s words and the photo he chose of two soldiers have each been copied and shared, turning the whole thing into a full-blown meme, much like Boston sports radio broadcaster Gerry Callahan’s post about Caitlyn Jenner winning ESPN’s Arthur Ashe Courage Award.” Courtesy BDCwire.

“Meantime, Coffey decided to do a bit of research on the photo he found and clipped online.

The image of two soldiers was created as therapy for a man who was severely beaten outside a New York bar in 2000. Mark Hogancamp was in a coma for nine days and hospitalized over a month.” Courtesy KSDK.

What Coffey´s didn´t know is that the photo he chose to show was the photo in a Marwencol documentary, which is about a cross-dresser named Mark Hogancamp.

Courtesy: Youtube

Courtesy: Youtube

Hogancamp was severely beaten by five men outside of a bar in 2000, which put him in a coma for nine days. He also suffered brain damage and memory loss.

When Hogancamp returned home, he found his closet was full of women’s clothes and couldn’t remember why he had them, because he was suffering from amnesia.

Courtesy: Youtube

Courtesy: Youtube

In a 2011 interview with the New York Times, he recalled a conversation he had with a friend after he was released from the hospital.

“Do I have a girlfriend?” he asked a friend.

“They’re yours,” the friend replied. “You collect them and you wear them.”

Mr. Hogancamp then learned that the men who beat him did so after he told them he was a cross-dresser.

After his severe beating, Hogancamp started making World War II mock-ups in his backyard in a town he called Marwencol to help stimulate his mind.

 Photo via Marwencol.com / Open Face

Photo via Marwencol.com / Open Face

Photos via Marwencol.com / Open Face

Photos via Marwencol.com / Open Face

A day after Coffey’s original post went viral, he decided to do more research, Coffey discovered the origin of the image.

Coffey then wrote how he was moved by the fact that the photo he used to protest Jenner was the work of a man who was beaten for cross-dressing.

He updated his status the following day:

We found this quote that we think is perfect for Coffey’s comment:

BRAVERY is not a quality of the body, it is of the SOUL” – M. K. Gandhi

Read a 2011 profile of Hogancamp in the 2011 New York Times and the fantasy world he has created called Marwencol.

And you, do you agree with Terry Coffey or you have a person opinion about it? Post it on the comments.

 

Compilation by Xiluva Costa, edited by Jocy Rowe

 

View the original sources:

BDCwire
Buzz Feed
KSDK

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